The Dyslexia Debate

By Julian G. Elliott, Durham University Elena L. Grigorenko, Yale University

The Dyslexia Debate examines how we use the term “dyslexia” and questions its efficacy as a diagnosis. While many believe that a diagnosis of dyslexia will shed light on a reader's struggles and help identify the best form of intervention, Julian G. Elliott and Elena L. Grigorenko show that it adds little value. In fact, our problematic
interpretation of the term could prove to be a major disservice to many children with difficulties learning to read. This book outlines in detail the diverse ways in which reading problems have been conceptualized and operationalized. Elliott and Grigorenko consider the latest research in cognitive science, genetics, and neuroscience, and the limitations of these fields in terms of professional action. They then provide a more helpful, scientifically rigorous way to describe the various types of reading difficulties and discuss empirically supported forms of intervention.

Published by and available from Cambridge University Press. www.cambridge.org

Comments:

"The Dyslexia Debate" examines how we use the term “dyslexia” and questions its efficacy as a diagnosis.

While many believe that a diagnosis of dyslexia will shed light on the nature of an individual’s reading difficulty, and help to guide intervention, the authors show that this term adds little value. In fact, the many varied and problematic understandings of dyslexia can result in a major disservice to those who encounter difficulties learning to read.

This book outlines in detail the diverse ways in which reading problems have been conceptualized and operationalized. The latest research in cognitive sciences, genetics and neuroscience, and the limitations of our knowledge in these fields for diagnosis and treatment, are discussed. The authors outline the most effective ways to help those with reading problems, and conclude by calling for an end to the use of the term ’dyslexia’, to be replaced by more helpful, scientifically rigorous descriptions.

Yvonne Meyer

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